WHY OLYMPIC LIFTING?

WHY OLYMPIC LIFTING?

15128922_1425942867423871_8519706493952271411_o

General Introduction:

The mere practice of the Olympic lifts teaches an athlete how to apply large amounts of force. Part of the extraordinary abilities of an Olympic lifter arises out of his having learned how to effectively activate more of his muscle fibers more rapidly than others who aren’t trained to do so. This becomes extremely important for athletes who need to remain at lower body weights for athletic purposes but need to learn how to apply greater force.—Artie Dreschler

Mr. Dreschler literally wrote the book on weightlifting. Clearly he wasn’t writing for competitive exercisers, but his comment could not be any more appropriate in relation to our sport. I say this at every camp, and I’ll say it again here: Rich Froning has the highest WL total of any Games athlete—Rich Froning has won the Games twice.

The debate on the importance of weightlifting should stop with my last statement, but fools will continue to quarrel. So here’s a quote from “Were the Games Well Programmed?” on Anders Larson’s CFG Analysis site:

What is clear from this is that HQ puts a large value on the Olympic lifts. The clean and snatch were worth a total of 5.35 events on their own! Add in shoulder-to-overhead (0.67) and that’s more than 6 events worth of points based on the Olympic lifts. Although I am a big fan of the Olympic lifts myself, I do think the snatch in particular was over-valued. It was worth nearly 14% of all the available points, including 20% of the Open and 17% of the Regional. Read More…

The Secret of Brown Eggs

15137530_1425942354090589_9033018111219356133_o
For years I’ve purchased brown eggs. Specifically, Trader Joe’s Brown Organic Free Range Eggs. I bypassed the cheaper options because it seemed like the healthy thing to do. I had the vague sense the brown color meant they were healthier, more natural, but I couldn’t tell you what any of the claims on the carton actually meant. Then I stumbled across a fact that blew my mind: The color of the eggs has nothing to do with how the chickens are raised.
 
Chickens with white feathers and white earlobes lay white eggs. Dark-feathered chickens with red earlobes lay brown eggs. That’s it. The reason brown eggs cost more is the brownegg-laying chickens eat more than the white-egg-laying chickens, so they’re more expensive to raise. Once I discovered the secret of brown eggs, I wondered what else I didn’t know. What’s the difference between free range and cage-free, and why are pastured eggs so expensive? Read More…
 

 

Post Workout Meal

15068353_1425943234090501_2011445152447149001_o

Time!  Is this where your workout ends? The sweaty, sucking wind, new PR post workout feeling is awesome, but the workout isn’t really over until the next one begins.  In response to exercise the muscle fibers are damaged, tissues are inflamed, and energy stores are depleted.  But as we know, this story doesn’t end so grim.  The body rebuilds itself and comes back even better to fight another day.  Therefore, we are going to do your body a favor, and lend a hand to this recovery process and present some key recovery issues and how to deal with them.  So without further ado, lets visit the most critical recovery  element- Nutrition.

Far too often nutrition takes a back seat, or maybe even put in the trunk, when it should really be driving the rig.  This is especially true post-exercise.  While the nutrition demands might be different depending on the nature of the workout, two main problems exist:

  1. Carbohydrate Stores are depleted
  2. Muscle proteins are broken-down

Without addressing these two problems, recovery is delayed.  This can lead to prolonged soreness and fatigue, decreases in future performance and feelings of lethargy associated with overtraining.  Therefore, use the following to make a solid post-workout nutrition plan, and make it just as important as getting your first muscle-up. Read More…