Categorized as: CF Naples

3 Drills For Building Wrist Flexibility

If you’re going to do handstands or many other gymnastic moves, then your hands and wrists can take a beating. Think about it: if you’re on your hands, your wrists are flexed back ninety degrees (or sometimes more) while bearing your entire body’s weight. Do this for a while and you’ve compounded lots of volume on top of that. For some people this never seems to be an issue. They’re naturally more flexible. Others don’t seem to have quite the flexibility and if they’re not smart about it, it can be painful and even injurious if you train your wrists too hard and too much.

I fall into that later group. Back in high school I played football and it was during that time that I injured my right wrist. It wasn’t broken, but a bad sprain caused it to become much less flexible than my left wrist. And since that injury, any time my wrist was flexed back I’d be in pain.

Fast forward a number of years and I was working on handstands. Sometimes the pain was better, at other times it was worse. There came a point when it got much worse, and any time I placed my hand flat on the floor I‘d be in pain. After much warm up, I could do handstands, but even then I would be leaning to my left side. The problem (and the pain) inhibited me from going any further in my hand balancing practice. It also impacted other things like bridging exercises and gymnastics. Even something as simple as a push up could still cause pain. Read More…

Snatch Balance

AKA Drop snatch (incorrectly)

 
The snatch balance is a dynamic snatch receiving position exercise that adds more demand on technique, precision and speed to the overhead squat. It is one of three snatch balance exercises whose names are often confused with each other or used interchangeably.
 
 
Execution
 
Start standing with the barbell behind your neck with a snatch-width grip and your feet in the pulling position. Bend the knees smoothly, maintaining balance and an upright torso, then push with the legs against the floor to create some upward momentum on the bar. Pick up your feet and replace them flat on the floor in your squat stance as you push aggressively against the bar to move yourself down into an overhead squat position. Lock your elbows and secure the bar in the overhead position in as low of a squat as you can without being rock-bottom—absorb the downward force of the bar by continuing to sit the rest of the way into the squat smoothly. Making sure the bar is stable and secure overhead, stand again, keeping the bar overhead. The goal is to elevate the barbell as little as possible from its starting point on the shoulders and to move the body down under it as quickly as possible.  
 
 
Notes
 
If you maintain the hook grip when you turn the snatch over, use the hook grip in the snatch balance. Read More…

How To Have Positive Attitude On A Negative Day

How’s your attitude this week? Do you have a positive one where people want to be around you and associate with you? Are you feeling like  a “Negative Nancy,” and for some reason, you always feel like you’re in a bad mood?

First, let’s address the big elephant in the room. Your attitude is a choice. The choice you make, no matter what the circumstances are, is yours and yours alone. But how do you maintain a positive attitude when things are terrible, when things are not going your way and you just feel awful?

Here are the tips and tricks that I’ve implemented in my own life. My wife tells me (sometimes annoyed) that I’m always in a good mood. I assure you, that’s not the case. I have my “shit” days – you know, those days where I can’t shake a feeling, or mindset. It’s like everytime I start to turn a corner, something whispers in the back of my head as a reminder to shift my focus back to what was originally pissing me off. What I’ve found by applying these following steps is that I can quickly course correct where my attitude is, versus where it should be.

First thing I do, I admit it. Outloud, for myself to hear. I admit when I’m having a bad attitude and openly acknowledge it. What separates this action from others is that I force myself to follow it up with something I am thankful for. For instance, “I’m very upset about this situation, but I am thankful that it’s a onetime deal and I don’t have to repeatedly deal with it.” Perhaps someone burned you, but the upside is that you were burned now instead of later when the consequences could have been far worse. Finding the one sliver of light in a bad situation can help things. Share what’s upsetting you. Get it out, so you can get it off your chest.

Two, set a timer. This creates a window that you’re going to allow yourself to be upset – and then be done with it. Author Hal Elrod of The Miracle Morning talks about his experiences with this. When he was in sales, everytime he would have bad conversation or lose out on an account, Hal would take out his phone and set a timer for 5 minutes. He could scream, curse, hit a punching bag, and do whatever he wanted for five minutes. Read More…

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