There’s a war raging over your beef, and you may not even know it! In spite of research spanning over 30 years, the battle between grass- and grain-fed has left many people scratching their heads as to whether or not the higher price per pound of grass-fed is worth their purchase.1

A longer time to harvest, the more ethical treatment of the animals, and less total end-product are a few of the many reasons that grass-fed beef costs more than its grain-raised counterpart. For example, a farmer raising and selling grain-fed cattle can break even by selling beef at $1.18 per pound, but the same farmer raising grass-fed beef needs to sell at $2.22 per pound. 2

Despite the added cost, the main argument for grass-fed beef rests on the fact that the feed provided to cattle has a profound impact on the nutrients within the meat that we end up eating.3 Grass-fed animals are leaner and provide a beneficial fat profile.

Check out this quick overview to help you decide if grass-fed beef is worth your hard-earned green!

1. SATURATED FAT CONTENT

It was once believed that saturated-fat intake was directly linked to an increased risk of heart disease. However, recent research has squashed this statement and placed the focus more specifically on the type of saturated fat consumed.4,5

There are multiple variations of saturated fat, but what’s important to know is that some are associated with a higher risk of disease than others. Grass-fed beef has been shown to be much higher in a “neutral” saturated fat, one that does not have an impact on cardiovascular-disease risk.6 This fatty acid, also known as stearic acid, is significantly elevated in grass-fed beef.7

Grain-fed beef, on the other hand, displays a nutrient makeup higher in the saturated-fat variants specifically linked to an increased risk for heart disease. This risk is related to the negative impact saturated fat has on total cholesterol levels. So, should you look for a second job so that you can afford this grass-fed goodness? Not so fast.

Consuming grain-fed beef 1-2 times per week probably won’t have major negative implications to your health—especially if you eat well and exercise regularly—but if you’re able to work in the occasional grass-fed option, you’ll be doing your body and taste buds a major favor!

GRAIN-FED BEEF DISPLAYS A NUTRIENT MAKEUP HIGHER IN THE SATURATED-FAT VARIANTS SPECIFICALLY LINKED TO AN INCREASED RISK FOR HEART DISEASE THAN GRASS-FED BEEF. Read More…