Categorized as: TECHNIQUE

Overhead Series

Learning the progression of lifts that moves from the shoulder press, to the push press, to the push jerk has long been a staple of the CrossFit regimen. This progression offers the opportunity to acquire some essential motor recruitment patterns found in sport and life (functionality) while greatly improving strength in the “power zone” and upper body. In terms of power zone and functional recruitment patterns, the push press and push jerk have no peer among the other presses like the “king” of upper body lifts, the bench press.

As the athlete moves from shoulder press, to push press, to push jerk, the importance of core to extremity muscle recruitment is learned and reinforced. This concept alone would justify the practice and training of these lifts. Core to extremity muscular recruitment is foundational to the effective and efficient performance of athletic movement. The most common errors in punching, jumping, throwing, and a multitude of other athletic movements typically express themselves as a violation of this concept.

Because good athletic movement begins at the core and radiates to the extremities, core strength is absolutely essential to athletic success. The region of the body from which these movements emanate, the core, is often referred to as the “power zone.” The muscle groups comprising the “power zone” include the hip flexors, hip extensors (glutes and hams), spinal erectors, and quadriceps. These lifts are enormous aids to developing the power zone.

READ MORE: http://www.crossfit.com/journal/library/PushpressJan03.pdf

Team

Friday’s Workout

For Time: 

  • 40 Box Jumps
  • 40 KB Swing
  • 30 Box Jumps
  • 30 KB Swing
  • 20 Box Jumps
  • 20 KB Swing
  • 10 Box Jumps
  • 10 KB Swing

Cash Out: 50 Sit ups

Saturday’s Workout

For Time:

  • 50 Press (45/35)
  • 50 Back Squat (45/35)
  • 40 Push Press (75/55)
  • 40 Front Squats (75/55)
  • 30 Push Jerk (95/65)
  • 30 Overhead Squats (95/65)

 

 

 

Beauty in Strength: Video

CrossFit can change how a woman both defines beauty and feels about her body, as Rita Benavidez, Jackie Perez, Erin Cianciolo and Andrea Ager discuss in this video.

Once thinking beauty was a picture of a waify woman on a magazine, Benavidez feels differently now. “My perception of beauty has changed over the past few years,” Benavidez says. “True beauty … is strength and fitness, and confidence in yourself.”

Perez was originally motivated by trying to be skinny. “That wasn’t getting me anywhere,” she says. “With CrossFit, I set goals. I want to deadlift 225, I’m going to hit that faster than I’m going to look in the mirror and like what I see.”

Ager says putting in the work is key to getting what you want. “I think that hard work and the way that your body looks go so hand-in-hand,” she says. “Once you do get a body that you want, you’re very proud of it … you’re proud of what your body can do.”

Through CrossFit, these women are confident, stronger and fitter. They are mothers, tomboys, coaches. They are CrossFit athletes.

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zvqNHDTf8Y

YOGA

 

Friday’s Workout

CF Total II

Power Clean 1 rep
Bench Press 1 rep
Overhead Squat 1 rep

Saturday’s Workout

20 min amrap

ADV

5 hspu
7 chest to bar pullup
10 alt db  snatch 70/50

INT

5 hspu
7 chest to bar pullup (assisted)
10 alt db squat snatch 50/40

SCALED

5 hs hold
7 chin to bar (assisted)
10 alt db squat snatch 35/25

Cash Out: Sled Drag 3sets

The Skill Transfer of the Burpee

One of CrossFit’s most-loathed movements, the burpee also represents a skill that can be transferred to other exercises, says gymnastics and movement guru Carl Paoli of San Francisco CrossFit.

“I go from flexion to extension to neutral to extension to flexion to neutral,” he explains. “It’s hard. And it goes back and forth, and it has so many moving pieces. That’s why the burpee is so hard.”

Athletes must move correctly with the knees out and the butt and stomach tight, Paoli says. From the ground, they snap in the feet for more efficient movement.

“That snap happens to be the same thing we see on kipping pull-ups, muscle-ups and even rope climb,” he says. “This is 90 percent of artistic gymnastics—being able to bow back and forth, snap down, turn things around fast.”

There is skill transfer in everything, Paoli notes.

“I need you guys to starting seeing skill on the rings, skill on burpees, skill on handstand push-ups, skill on rope climb—it’s the same,” he says. “And how you take this and you apply it to Olympic weightlifting, if you can’t do that, something’s wrong with the program.”

FREE DOWNLOAD of Carl explaining more details.

(These scores below represent the time taken to complete 100 burpees for time) What percentile will you fall under?

burpee scores

Monday’s Workout (April 29, 2013)

Strength

Overhead Squat 3-3-3-3-3

WOD

100 Burpees for Time or Max Reps in 10 minutes

Tuesday’s Workout (April 30, 2013)
5 rounds:
25 Double Unders
20 Wall balls

What is mobility?

Mobility should be a proactive approach, not a reactive one. In other words, don’t wait until problems arise before you address them. Too often I will see athletes finish a workout that might have hundreds of repetitions of loaded squats or pressing and do absolutely nothing to address the potential issues that are usually right around the corner. Having said that, there’s a great deal you can do to prevent injury, speed recovery, and improve performance. We can break down mobilization into three primary modalities: soft tissue work, stretching, and joint mobilization.

Soft Tissue Work
There are a number of modalities within soft tissue work. In gyms, self-myofascial release (SMFR) is the most common form of soft tissue work. Tools such as foam rollersmassage stickstheracanes, and lacrosse balls are common tools for this modality. SMFR can be performed before or after training sessions. Sometimes SMFR alone isn’t enough and an athlete will have to seek out a massage therapist, chiropractor, or physical therapist who is trained to deal with issues outside the scope of a fitness coach.

Stretching
Static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching are the two most common ways to stretch short, tight muscles. Static stretching normally involves using stretches that hold the target muscle in a lengthened position. PNF stretching comes in a variety of forms but most commonly is performed by stretching the tight muscle, isometrically contracting the muscle, and then stretching the muscle further. Kelly Starrett recommends five cycles of 5 seconds of contraction followed by 10 seconds of passive stretching. Watch Kelly Starrett demo PNF stretching here:http://www.mobilitywod.com/2011/01/episode-148365-pnf-demo-deadlifting.html.

Joint Mobilization
The goal of joint mobilization is to help increase extensibility of a joint capsule by breaking up adhesions and/or stretching the capsule itself. Be cautious if you are experiencing pain or are prone to joint subluxations or dislocations as joint mobilization is contraindicated. Having said that, I would also advise against using any sort of band distraction if you are pregnant as the increased joint laxity can be problematic.

flex

Tuesday’s Workout
600m row buy in
5 rounds
50m Farmers Carry
10 Dips
10 pushups

Wednesday’s Workout
AMRAP in 15 minutes:
3 Hang snatches 135# / 95#
Then:
6 Pull ups
12 Push ups
12 Box jumps 24″/20″

Correcting the Deadlift

The deadlift is a functional movement. It is nothing other than picking something off the floor. When picking up a barbell, there are three setup conditions that create efficient, effective and safe mechanics: weight on the heels, maintaining solid midline stability, and having the shoulders just in front of the bar. The bar should travel vertically without having to move forward around the knees.

Many athletes set up too vertically, with the hips down, knees forward, and shoulders behind the bar. Rachel corrects this and other common flaws in the deadlift. Read MORE

Deadlift

Friday’s Workout

For 2o minutes:

Every odd min-5 Deadlifts at 275/165

Every even min-10 Weighted Situps

 

Power Clean equals explosion

The power clean is critical to sports performance training because it is a scalable way to develop power, writes Mark Rippetoe, of The Wichita Falls Athletic Club/CrossFit Wichita Falls.

The power clean teaches explosion. It cannot be done slowly. And since it involves a longer pull than the squat clean, it emphasizes the finish, where the maximum hip, knee, and ankle extension occurs, without the added complication of the front squat part of the movement.

There will be a weight, however light or heavy, that the athlete can handle correctly. That weight can be gradually increased, enabling athletes of any level of advancement to increase power production. Since athletics depends so heavily on the ability to exert force rapidly, the clean is a very useful tool for all athletes.

The power clean is best thought of as a jump with the bar in the hands, followed immediately by an upward forward slam of the elbows to rack it on the shoulders. It is much easier to learn from the hang position; learning it off the floor tends to understate the importance of the explosive phase at the top.

There are a couple of cues that we can use that are most effective:

1. Jump and Land in a partial squat
2. Keep elbows and torso up
3. Stay tight

Monday’s Workout:

Skill of the Week: Rope Climb

Strength:
Bench (Heavy 4 rep)

Conditioning:

Teams of Two- 5000m Row (500m each)

-Partner can do Perfect Push-ups to make up for time (count on a “no rep” if not perfect, exquisite, and beautiful). Each Pushup equals 1m on the Row. Modified will not count.

-20 minute cap.

Tuesday’s Workout

Skill of the Week: Rope Climb

Conditioning: 

10.9.8.7.6.5.4.3.2.1 for time:
Power Clean (75% BW)
Pullup