Tagged as: box jump

How Often Should I CrossFit?

The intent of your individual training frequency is to train often enough to reach your fitness goals, but not often enough to overtrain or develop overuse injuries. Training frequency is dependent upon many factors, the most important of which are goals, intensity, rest, nutrition, and existing level of fitness. The remainder of your daily/weekly schedule is also a relevant factor. Let’s examine how each one affects your training.

Goals
If you simply want to maintain an adequate level of fitness for daily life and ward off obesity then your training frequency will differ substantially from an elite athlete seeking to compete in the national CrossFit Games. Training more frequently will advance your fitness faster, to a point.

Intensity

If you train more intensely then you will require more rest than if you train less intensely. If CrossFit is your workout regimen then we can probably summarize your workout intensity as either intense or very intense, assuming you are putting 100% effort into your workouts.

Rest

Quality and quantity of rest are a huge factor in training frequency. Quality rest increases your ability to train more frequently. I’m defining quality and quantity in two principal ways: your level of activity on your rest days, and hours of sleep per night. The most effective rest is lack of prolonged or intense physical activity during the day plus 8.5-9 consecutive hours of sleep per night. Yes, that’s asking a lot of the typical American schedule.

Nutrition

This is pretty simple. If your body is getting the nutrients it needs to perform tissue repair and fuel your workouts then you can train more often. If you eat poorly then you will inevitably train less often or with less intensity, and will require more rest when you are done. Your body also won’t get as full a benefit from the workout because you haven’t supplied it with the tools to fully adapt to the stress you provided during the workout.

Read More HERE

 

Overhead Series

Learning the progression of lifts that moves from the shoulder press, to the push press, to the push jerk has long been a staple of the CrossFit regimen. This progression offers the opportunity to acquire some essential motor recruitment patterns found in sport and life (functionality) while greatly improving strength in the “power zone” and upper body. In terms of power zone and functional recruitment patterns, the push press and push jerk have no peer among the other presses like the “king” of upper body lifts, the bench press.

As the athlete moves from shoulder press, to push press, to push jerk, the importance of core to extremity muscle recruitment is learned and reinforced. This concept alone would justify the practice and training of these lifts. Core to extremity muscular recruitment is foundational to the effective and efficient performance of athletic movement. The most common errors in punching, jumping, throwing, and a multitude of other athletic movements typically express themselves as a violation of this concept.

Because good athletic movement begins at the core and radiates to the extremities, core strength is absolutely essential to athletic success. The region of the body from which these movements emanate, the core, is often referred to as the “power zone.” The muscle groups comprising the “power zone” include the hip flexors, hip extensors (glutes and hams), spinal erectors, and quadriceps. These lifts are enormous aids to developing the power zone.

READ MORE: http://www.crossfit.com/journal/library/PushpressJan03.pdf

Team

Friday’s Workout

For Time: 

  • 40 Box Jumps
  • 40 KB Swing
  • 30 Box Jumps
  • 30 KB Swing
  • 20 Box Jumps
  • 20 KB Swing
  • 10 Box Jumps
  • 10 KB Swing

Cash Out: 50 Sit ups

Saturday’s Workout

For Time:

  • 50 Press (45/35)
  • 50 Back Squat (45/35)
  • 40 Push Press (75/55)
  • 40 Front Squats (75/55)
  • 30 Push Jerk (95/65)
  • 30 Overhead Squats (95/65)

 

 

 

Nutrition for Athletes (Pre & Post WOD)

Congrats to Kirk, Greg, David C, Mikkel, Stephanie, and Petergaye for signing up for their first ever CrossFit Competition in June. This is a one day event that includes four different workouts. Every week we are meeting with our athletes to discuss competition strategie for both physical performance and nutrition.
Here are some strategies that we can all benefit whether you are competing in a competition or competing in class. The information was borrowed from the Optimum Performance Training website (http://optexperience.com). The OPT program does a very good job of “individualizing CF training”. His belief is that all athletes are different and respond differently in training and in nutrition (via absorption, digestion, timing, quality, quanity, etc. My two cents is highlighted in bold.

Nutrition for Athletes (Pre & Post WOD)

If we take these into consideration, you can see it could really change things up.  If you are still saying “Ok, but WHAT do I eat??”, here are a few guidelines:

  1. As a very broad generalization, there should be a 2-3 hr buffer between whole food intake and training. If you come to the class at 6am and you don’t eat anything and you perform well more “power” to you.

  2. Intensity & duration affect gastrointestinal tolerance; the more intense thw workout, the less your stomach will like (digest, transport, deliver, utilize) food.  Similar for duration, and intensity. Protein shakes, L-glutamine, Catalyst, Electrolytes are crucial here. Ease of absorption goes a long way.

  3. Glycogen (stored carbohydrate) stores are affected by your previous training session, and more importantly, your meals the day BEFORE. If you had a high carb meal the night before the likelihood of needing another high carb meal before a a.m. workout is low.

  4. Morning sessions:  Fasted.  This is fine—be hydrated, but know you are fueled by the night before meal.

  5. Anything under 60 minutes does NOT require intra-workout fueling via carbohydrates. Water will do the trick during the workout and in class.

  6. A small amount of whey works well for most people. (>20g)

  7. On that same note, BCAAs (branched-chain amino acids) work better. (Catalyst, L-glutamine)

  8. Caffeine works well here, but can be a double-edged sword… (don’t use day of if you never consume caffeine). Same goes for energy drinks. Watch out for FREE stuff from sponsors.  Don’t sabotage yourself.

  9. Don’t try something new the day of competition. If its not broken don’t try to change it.

CrossFit Pyramid

Friday’s Workout

Strength: Press (1RM)

Conditioning:

ADV

7 rounds for max reps:

  • 1 min HSPU
  • rest 30 seconds 
  • 1 min strict burpee-box jumps (30/24)
  • rest 1 min

INT

7 rounds for max reps:

  • 1 min HSPU (raised)
  • rest 30 seconds 
  • 1 min strict burpee-box jumps (24/20)
  • rest 1 min

BEG

6 rounds for max reps:

  • 1 min HS Hold
  • rest 30 seconds 
  • 1 min strict modified pushup-to-step up (20in)
  • rest 1 min

Saturday’s Workout

ADV

3 rounds for reps:

  • 1 min max KB swing-full (70/53)
  • 2 min max Doubles
  • 3 minutes Sit ups
  • Rest 1 min between rounds. Post Total Score. 2o min wod with rest included.

INT

3 rounds for reps:

  • 1 min max KB swing-full (53/35)
  • 2 min max Single-Single-Double
  • 3 minutes Sit ups

BEG

3 rounds for reps:

  • 1 min max KB swing-partial (35/25)
  • 2 min max Singles
  • 3 minutes Sit ups

9:30 Yoga $10