Tagged as: row

What is mobility?

Mobility should be a proactive approach, not a reactive one. In other words, don’t wait until problems arise before you address them. Too often I will see athletes finish a workout that might have hundreds of repetitions of loaded squats or pressing and do absolutely nothing to address the potential issues that are usually right around the corner. Having said that, there’s a great deal you can do to prevent injury, speed recovery, and improve performance. We can break down mobilization into three primary modalities: soft tissue work, stretching, and joint mobilization.

Soft Tissue Work
There are a number of modalities within soft tissue work. In gyms, self-myofascial release (SMFR) is the most common form of soft tissue work. Tools such as foam rollersmassage stickstheracanes, and lacrosse balls are common tools for this modality. SMFR can be performed before or after training sessions. Sometimes SMFR alone isn’t enough and an athlete will have to seek out a massage therapist, chiropractor, or physical therapist who is trained to deal with issues outside the scope of a fitness coach.

Static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching are the two most common ways to stretch short, tight muscles. Static stretching normally involves using stretches that hold the target muscle in a lengthened position. PNF stretching comes in a variety of forms but most commonly is performed by stretching the tight muscle, isometrically contracting the muscle, and then stretching the muscle further. Kelly Starrett recommends five cycles of 5 seconds of contraction followed by 10 seconds of passive stretching. Watch Kelly Starrett demo PNF stretching here:http://www.mobilitywod.com/2011/01/episode-148365-pnf-demo-deadlifting.html.

Joint Mobilization
The goal of joint mobilization is to help increase extensibility of a joint capsule by breaking up adhesions and/or stretching the capsule itself. Be cautious if you are experiencing pain or are prone to joint subluxations or dislocations as joint mobilization is contraindicated. Having said that, I would also advise against using any sort of band distraction if you are pregnant as the increased joint laxity can be problematic.


Tuesday’s Workout
600m row buy in
5 rounds
50m Farmers Carry
10 Dips
10 pushups

Wednesday’s Workout
AMRAP in 15 minutes:
3 Hang snatches 135# / 95#
6 Pull ups
12 Push ups
12 Box jumps 24″/20″

humbled by many things

I sit here trying to think of an awesome topic to write about and all I can think about is how HUMBLED I am of these last couple of days

Two amazing things happened to me this weekend:
1. I bought my first BMW
2. I passed my State Board Exams for Massage Therapy

It might sound pompous that I talking about my new BMW but if you know anything about me you know everything I’ve driven in the past was modest at best. 1990 Chevrolet with 150,000miles, a 1995 Chevy Caviler, an most recently a Honda CRV.  I wanted something different this time. I wanted something to symbolize my hard work. Plus I worked really hard to pay off my old car, save a couple thousand dollars, and most importantly have kept my credit score at an A+ rating. It was a smooth purchase to say the least.

I also passed my State Boards for Massage Therapy on Saturday. Working 15 hour days have become the norm for me. Coaching classes, going to school, to coach more classes has not been easy. I do it because it brings me great joy to see my members work hard, but I’m human, I get tired and exhausted too. I’ve been studying for 6 months to pass this test. I worked really hard and it paid off!

I think you get what I’m trying to say. The expression “DO WORK” that I say all the time in class is an extension of what I’m trying to instill in you guys and that is “working hard always pays off”. If there is something you want reach for the stars. If you are passionate about something, go do it. Great things come to those who work hard, and remain hopeful.




Picture 51

Monday’s Workout

For time:
Run, 1 mi
Row, 2000 m
Run, 1 mi
CAP 30 minutes

-Teams of 2

Cash Out: 3 sets of 30 seconds Max Air Dyne Sprints

Tuesday’s Workout

3 rounds for time of:

Overhead Walking Lunge, 45/35 lb barbell, 50 ft

21 Burpees




My fighterman

Jennie West is a mother of three boys, one of whom was born with half a heart (Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome). Her writings follow the journey of motherhood at home and in a hospital. Read more at http://thebestofthewests.blogspot.com/

By Jennie West (our very own)

It’s dusk here. I love this time of day. It is when the world starts to settle. Calm makes its way in to take over from the chaos of the day. It is when the aroma of dinner begins to fill the house and freshly bathed littles in their jams start to mellow for the night. I am looking out over the window of Paxton’s hospital room, staring at the setting sun with longing; my “fighterman” asleep behind me. I am reminded of how much bigger life is than we can even imagine. Just as the miracle of babies growing in our bellies is more than just a science, so too is the rising and falling of the sun each day. Life is big, but there is ever so much more to it when you stop to take it all in.

We are amidst life and death right this very moment. Babies on either side of us cling to life. As I stare out, I am acutely aware of this. As far away and as lonely as I feel right now from life on the outside, I am also incredibly aware that this in here is life too. That sometimes paths involve a fight we never expected. A path that is far more than everyday carlines, dinners and play dates. A path of separation, struggle, fight and glory. That glory a well of emotion I never knew until I had children, most significantly one that has had to cling to life himself.

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Friday’s Workout

“Time Trial 2.0”

400m Row
400m Run
40 Double Unders

2 sets: Rest 3 minutes